Michael Matthew Kaylor

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An ambitious genius rethinking the transatlantic politically conscious URANIANS, who as elitist as the Bloomsbury circle but excluding females and bisexuals, has not yet been taken up by the gay liberation movement.

Please check out Michael Matthew Kaylor's list of publications (as PDF)

Personal Biography

Birth: 2 December 1968 (Kettering, Ohio, USA)
Workplace
Department of English and American Studies
Faculty of Arts
Masaryk University
Arna Nováka 1
602 00 Brno, Czech Republic
Employment Position
Assistant Professor
Education and Academic Qualifications
2005: Doctor of Philosophy in English Literature (University of Szeged, Hungary)
1994: Master of Arts in English (University of Akron, Ohio, USA)
1992: Bachelor of Arts in English (University of Akron, Ohio, USA)
Employment Summary
2005-present: Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic (Assistant Professor)
2003-2005: Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic (Guest Lecturer)
1997-2005: University of Pardubice, Czech Republic (Instructor of English)
1995-1998: Gymnázium Pardubice, Czech Republic (Instructor of English)
1992-1995: University of Akron, Ohio, USA (Instructor of English)
Pedagogical Activities
British Cultural Studies
British Literature 1770-1830: Romanticism
British Literature 1890-1945: Modernism
English Romantic Poetry
English Victorian Poetry
Literary and Cultural Theory
Gay Studies
Scientific and Research Activities
Romantic and Victorian Poetry
The Uranian Movement
British Decadence
Textual Editing
Theory of Biography
Book Culture
Gay Studies
Victorian Paederasty


Gerard Manley Hopkins (presently writing his biography)
Henry James (presently writing a book on his late novels)


Member of The North American Victorian Studies Association (NAVSA)
Member of The British Association for Victorian Studies (BAVS)
Member of The Czech Association for the Study of English (CZASE)

Selected Publications

Kaylor, Michael Matthew - Reid, Forrest. The Garden God: A Tale of Two Boys. 1st edn. Kansas City, MO, USA : Valancourt Books, 2007. 160 s. Valancourt Books. ISBN 1-934555-04-5. URL info
Kaylor, Michael Matthew. Secreted Desires: The Major Uranians: Hopkins, Pater and Wilde. 1st ed. Brno : Masaryk University Press, 2006. 497 s. edice neuvedena. ISBN 80-210-4126-9. Open-access, electronic version in Adobe Reader PDF info
Kaylor, Michael Matthew. 'Tempting Suggestible Young Men': Pater, Pedagogy, Pederasty. In Scientific Papers of the University of Pardubice, Series C, 10, 2004. Pardubice : University of Pardubice, 2005. od s. 63-113, 51 s. ISBN 80-7194-734-2. info
Kaylor, Michael Matthew. To Cremate or Bury: Gerard Manley Hopkins, Coventry Patmore, and the Biographical Postmortem. In Second Prague Conference on Linguistics and Literary Studies (14 May 2004) Proceedings. Prague : Pedagogical Faculty, Charles University, 2005. od s. 110-20, 11 s. ISBN 80-7290-221-0. info
Kaylor, Michael Matthew. 'In Thy Cedarn Prison Thou Waitest': Johnson's "Ionica" and Uranian Intertextuality. In Theory and Practice in English Studies. Brno : Masaryk University, 2005. od s. 79-85, vol. 4, 7 s. ISBN 80-210-3836-5. info
Kaylor, Michael Matthew. 'Lizard, the Greeks Called It': Guy Davenport and the Uranian Present. In Cultural Studies at the Turn of the Millennium. Pardubice : University of Pardubice, 2005. od s. 39-56, 18 s. ISBN 80-7194-816-0. info
Kaylor, Michael Matthew. 'The Divine Friend, Unknown, Most Desired': The Problematic Uranian Poets. In Theory and Practice in English Studies. Brno : Masaryk University, 2004. od s. 71-76, vol. 2, 6 s. ISBN 80-210-3394-0. info
Kaylor, Michael Matthew. 'Little Porcelain Cup in Which Biting Acids Could Be Mixed': Wilde's Sons as the Audience for 'The Young King'. In New Interpretations of Cultural Phenomena. Pardubice : University of Pardubice, 2004. od s. 23-32, 10 s. ISBN 80-7194-710-5. info
Kaylor, Michael Matthew. 'Pen, Pencil and Poison' Wilde-Style. In Scientific Papers of the University of Pardubice, Series C, 8, 2002. Pardubice : University of Pardubice, 2003. od s. 41-60, 20 s. ISBN 80-7194-537-4. info
Kaylor, Michael Matthew. 'Scattered Parts': Writing the Life of Gerard Manley Hopkins. In Prague Conference on Linguistics and Literary Studies (10 May 2002) Proceedings. Prague : Pedagogical Faculty, Charles University, 2003. od s. 118-125, 8 s. ISBN 80-7290-104-4. info
Kaylor, Michael Matthew. The Poet's Undergarments: the Problematic Concept of Identity in the Life of Gerard Manley Hopkins. In The Issue of Identity, Identity and Globalization. Pardubice : University of Pardubice, 2003. od s. 12-26, 15 s. ISBN 80-7194-590-0. info
Kaylor, Michael Matthew. 'The Faint Intelligence': Vocabulary and Its Void in Lewis Carroll's 'Jabberwocky' and Henry James's 'What Maisie Knew'. In Children's Literature in English at the Turn of the Millennium. Hradec Králové : The British Council, Gaudeamus, 2002. od s. 129-138, 10 s. ISBN 80-7041-940-7. info
Kaylor, Michael Matthew. 'Backward I See': Hopkins's Inverse in Verse. In Precursors, Predecessors, Precedents: The Continuing Influence of the 19th Century on Modern Texts and Contexts. Pardubice : University of Pardubice, 2002. od s. 8-20, 13 s. ISBN 80-7194-426-2. info
Kaylor, Michael Matthew. 'Beautiful Dripping Fragments': A Whitmanesque Reading of Hopkins' 'Epithalamion'. Victorian poetry, Morgantown, W.Va. : West Virginia University, 2002, 40.2, od s. 157-187, 31 s. ISSN 0042-5206. 2002. info
PUBLICATIONS OVERVIEW

2007
The Garden God: A Tale of Two Boys
KAYLOR, Michael Matthew - REID, Forrest.
The Garden God: A Tale of Two Boys. Vyd. 1st edn. Kansas City, MO, USA : Valancourt Books, 2007. 160 s. Valancourt Books. Forrest Reid's 1905 novel, edited with a foreword, introduction and notes by Michael Matthew Kaylor. ISBN 1-934555-04-5.

2006
Secreted Desires: The Major Uranians: Hopkins, Pater and Wilde KAYLOR, Michael Matthew.
Secreted Desires: The Major Uranians: Hopkins, Pater and Wilde. Vyd. 1st ed. Brno : Masaryk University Press, 2006. 497 s. edice neuvedena. ISBN 80-210-4126-9.

2005
'In Thy Cedarn Prison Thou Waitest': Johnson's "Ionica" and Uranian Intertextuality KAYLOR, Michael Matthew.
'In Thy Cedarn Prison Thou Waitest': Johnson's "Ionica" and Uranian Intertextuality. In Theory and Practice in English Studies. Brno : Masaryk University, 2005. ISBN 80-210-3836-5, pp. 79-85, vol. 4.

'Lizard, the Greeks Called It': Guy Davenport and the Uranian Present KAYLOR, Michael Matthew.
'Lizard, the Greeks Called It': Guy Davenport and the Uranian Present. In Cultural Studies at the Turn of the Millennium. Pardubice : University of Pardubice, 2005. ISBN 80-7194-816-0, pp. 39-56.

'Tempting Suggestible Young Men': Pater, Pedagogy, Pederasty KAYLOR, Michael Matthew.
'Tempting Suggestible Young Men': Pater, Pedagogy, Pederasty. In Scientific Papers of the University of Pardubice, Series C, 10, 2004. Pardubice : University of Pardubice, 2005. ISBN 80-7194-734-2, pp. 63-113.

To Cremate or Bury: Gerard Manley Hopkins, Coventry Patmore, and the Biographical Postmortem KAYLOR, Michael Matthew.
To Cremate or Bury: Gerard Manley Hopkins, Coventry Patmore, and the Biographical Postmortem. In Second Prague Conference on Linguistics and Literary Studies (14 May 2004) Proceedings. Prague : Pedagogical Faculty, Charles University, 2005. ISBN 80-7290-221-0, pp. 110-20.

2004
'Little Porcelain Cup in Which Biting Acids Could Be Mixed': Wilde's Sons as the Audience for 'The Young King' KAYLOR, Michael Matthew.
'Little Porcelain Cup in Which Biting Acids Could Be Mixed': Wilde's Sons as the Audience for 'The Young King'. In New Interpretations of Cultural Phenomena. Pardubice : University of Pardubice, 2004. ISBN 80-7194-710-5, pp. 23-32. 2004.

'The Divine Friend, Unknown, Most Desired': The Problematic Uranian Poets KAYLOR, Michael Matthew.
'The Divine Friend, Unknown, Most Desired': The Problematic Uranian Poets. In Theory and Practice in English Studies. Brno : Masaryk University, 2004. ISBN 80-210-3394-0, pp. 71-76, vol. 2. 2004.

2003
'Pen, Pencil and Poison' Wilde-Style KAYLOR, Michael Matthew.
'Pen, Pencil and Poison' Wilde-Style. In Scientific Papers of the University of Pardubice, Series C, 8, 2002. Pardubice : University of Pardubice, 2003. ISBN 80-7194-537-4, pp. 41-60.

'Scattered Parts': Writing the Life of Gerard Manley Hopkins KAYLOR, Michael Matthew.
'Scattered Parts': Writing the Life of Gerard Manley Hopkins. In Prague Conference on Linguistics and Literary Studies (10 May 2002) Proceedings. Prague : Pedagogical Faculty, Charles University, 2003. ISBN 80-7290-104-4, pp. 118-125. 2003.

The Poet's Undergarments: the Problematic Concept of Identity in the Life of Gerard Manley Hopkins KAYLOR, Michael Matthew.
The Poet's Undergarments: the Problematic Concept of Identity in the Life of Gerard Manley Hopkins. In The Issue of Identity, Identity and Globalization. Pardubice : University of Pardubice, 2003. ISBN 80-7194-590-0, pp. 12-26. 2003.

2002
'Backward I See': Hopkins's Inverse in Verse KAYLOR, Michael Matthew.
'Backward I See': Hopkins's Inverse in Verse. In Precursors, Predecessors, Precedents: The Continuing Influence of the 19th Century on Modern Texts and Contexts. Pardubice : University of Pardubice, 2002. ISBN 80-7194-426-2, pp. 8-20. 2002.

'Beautiful Dripping Fragments': A Whitmanesque Reading of Hopkins' 'Epithalamion' KAYLOR, Michael Matthew.
'Beautiful Dripping Fragments': A Whitmanesque Reading of Hopkins' 'Epithalamion'. Victorian poetry, Morgantown, W.Va., West Virginia University. ISSN 0042-5206, 2002, vol. 2002, no. 40.2, pp. 157-187.

'The Faint Intelligence': Vocabulary and Its Void in Lewis Carroll's 'Jabberwocky' and Henry James's 'What Maisie Knew' KAYLOR, Michael Matthew.
'The Faint Intelligence': Vocabulary and Its Void in Lewis Carroll's 'Jabberwocky' and Henry James's 'What Maisie Knew'. In Children's Literature in English at the Turn of the Millennium. Hradec Králové : The British Council, Gaudeamus, 2002. ISBN 80-7041-940-7, pp. 129-138.


Terry L. Meyers (College of William and Mary), 'Review of Secreted Desires—The Major Uranians: Hopkins, Pater and Wilde, by Michael Matthew Kaylor', Victorians Institute Journal, Volume 35 (2007), p. 315. ISSN: 0886-3865


This is an extraordinary volume, but not an easy one to read. That comes partly from the subject, pederasty, and partly from the disconcerting exuberance with which Kaylor explores the subject in obsessive and sometimes eccentric detail. Kaylor is especially interested in what he sees as pederastic inclinations in Gerard Manley Hopkins, Walter Pater, and Oscar Wilde, but the book is longer and more convoluted, more erratic in development, than a good editor would allow; as interesting as some of the many digressions and footnotes are, they make following Kaylor's thesis sometimes a challenge. Kaylor comments that his book 'arose from his doctoral dissertation'—but it has not, apparently, risen very far.

Nevertheless, Secreted Desires is an erudite and important study that joins a slew of scholarly works on Victorian sexuality and Victorian writers' sexual proclivities. Scholars working with Hopkins, Pater, and Wilde especially will need to engage it, but anyone working with Victorian sexuality will learn a great deal.

Kaylor warns that his approach will be 'unapologetically monothematic�� as he seeks 'to demarcate the distinctly paederastic elements often hidden beneath the complex surfaces of texts … highly nuanced and intended primarily for a select group of readers (perhaps a subculture), fittingly labeled "Uranian" by Timothy d'Arch Smith'.

Kaylor's Preface, a rapid and learned overview of Uranian writers and writing, is followed by an Introduction, five chapters, and four appendices. The chapters deal with 1) recent critical discussions of Hopkins' sexuality, 2) Hopkins' 'unique scholarly problematics', 3) a close reading of his 'Epithalamion', 4) the 'paederastic pedagogy advocated in Pater's Marius the Epicurean', and 5) 'the breach between Pater and Wilde'. In the Conclusion Kaylor traces the Uranian influence of [William] Johnson, the poetry and life of Digby Dolben, and the continuing thread of writing in the tradition of the Uranian poets, as in the fiction of Guy Davenport. The appendices reproduce a pederastic contribution to the pornographic magazine The Pearl, a supportive letter to Kaylor from Timothy d'Arch Smith, a transcript of a 1718 Old Bailey Trial for buggery, and the text of Hopkins' 'Epithalamion'. Kaylor's bibliography is an impressive resource on Victorian sexuality. One major flaw: no index.

Kaylor has read extensively in criticism and biography (as well as in theory, art and art history, and Victorian (and other) sexuality), and is a careful, thorough, and educated reader of texts. But his willingness to repeat himself, to take on all critical comers in detail, to bring in analogous or even tangentially-related examples���all this requires of the reader an unusual patience.

But for all its shortcomings, and its sometimes luridly voyeuristic readings, Kaylor's study does advance our understanding of a group of writers who will always be marginal but interesting. Does Kaylor achieve his goal, bringing Hopkins, Pater, and Wilde into this cult as its major writers? I think he does, not elegantly, not smoothly, but, in his own idiosyncratic, even eccentric way, compellingly.


Jon Barnes (author of The Somnambulist), '[Review of] The Garden God: A Tale of Two Boys. By Forrest Reid. Edited by Michael Matthew Kaylor. 102pp. [+ intro.] Kansas City, MO: Valancourt Books', Times Literary Supplement, Issue 5,450 (14 September 2007), p. 29. ISSN: 0307-661X


Forrest Reid was not a man with whom it was politic to be too publicly associated. His novel, The Garden God, published in November 1905 in a lavish limited edition bound in vellum and gold, was dedicated to Henry James ('this slight token of respect and admiration') but, after reading it, James abruptly and irrevocably ceased all contact with its author. Reid cuts no less troubling a figure to the modern eye. The writer of sixteen novels and two volumes of autobiography, he was the kind of man who made friends with other people's children, who took up stamp collecting so that he might more easily approach small boys and engage them in philatelic chat. Though Reid's biographer, Brian Taylor, insists that 'if there can be such a thing as a puritanical pederast, Forrest Reid was that person', Reid's career was marred by inappropriate attachments, by whispers of scandal, by intimations of thwarted desire.

The Garden God concerns the doomed friendship between two schoolboys—the languid Graham Iddesleigh whose sole gift is a 'capacity for sitting in the sun' and the lissom Harold Brocklehurst, whose 'eyes were blue and dark and clear, his nose straight, his mouth extraordinarily fine, delicate; his dark hair, soft and silky, falling in a single great wave over his shapely forehead'. On their first meeting, Iddesleigh feels 'an ecstasy of happiness … as if the summer were quite suddenly and unexpectedly come; as if the whole world were full of happiness and sunshine', and swiftly finds himself desiring that the other boy's hands should be 'laid softly upon his own forehead, or over his mouth and eyes'.

This new edition from the American small press Valancourt Books is scholarly, meticulous and comprehensive, with an introduction by its editor Michael Matthew Kaylor, in which the case for Reid's literary rehabilitation and canonicity is energetically rehearsed. Nonetheless, it is not difficult to understand Henry James's reaction. The Garden God still feels dangerously overheated, its prose filled with the quality of overripe fruit—sensual and sweet, but with the promise of corruption underneath.


Nadine Cooper (University of North Carolina at Greensboro), '[Review of] Reid, Forrest. The Garden God: A Tale of Two Boys (1905). Michael Matthew Kaylor, ed. Kansas City: Valancourt Books, 2007. lvi + 100 pp. $14.95', English Literature in Transition, 1880-1920, Volume 51, Number 2 (2008), p. 240. ISSN: 0013-8339


Lifted from obscurity, this text is delightfully revisited by Kaylor, whose admiration for this author is evident throughout his introduction. We all have writers who are dear to us for one reason or another, and Kaylor espouses his love for Reid's works with such honest familiarity: 'Reid has ever been my "secret playmate", a playmate whose texts—nearly sacred, at least to me—have always been read for pleasure, without a clutched pencil'. Although one might joke about reading introductions last, this is an exception, since so much is added to the reading of the original text, made more poignant by Kaylor's intricate description of Reid's life, not to mention his thorough explanatory notes. This book is fascinating, of course, from a cultural standpoint. Reid, writing of adolescent boys, falls into the category of 'pederastic literature' that allies him 'to that band of writers producing Uranian stories and poetry', a dangerous occupation since 'even among the university educated of his day, same-sex desire, in any of its manifestations, was beyond the pale'. Reid changed the dedication from his 'beloved friend Andrew Rutherford' to a seemingly more safe alternative, Henry James (incurring James's unwavering animosity). Nonetheless, Reid's book was still a 'display of daring' following in the wake of the Oscar Wilde trials. Known as 'The Pan of Ulster', Reid seemed to follow 'an elevated form of pederasty' to express an 'erotic disposition.' This relationship is exemplified by a connection between the pagan god Pan and a boy. To Reid this relationship is aesthetic, for according to Kaylor, Reid is much more a follower of Walter Pater than Wilde's more 'blatantly carnal tradition'. Says Kaylor: 'if there can be such a thing as a puritanical pederast, Forrest Reid was that person'. Yet Kaylor is not naive and concedes that there may be darker hints beyond the curtain of privacy that Reid drew about him in the provincial outskirts of Belfast. But the book is an escape into a garden, and it is Reid's writing that transcends any political or cultural problematics. It is a story of remembrance, of fine moments lost, yet relived. It is a story about the power and reality of writing—of the ability of past writers to still move the reader, like the boy's admiration for Plato: 'of all writers, this old Greek had the most delightfully personal charm. As he read him, indeed, it seemed as if the peculiar beauty of his nature were exhaled gently from the printed pages … like, say, the faint perfume of a spray of sweet-briar he had dried a few days ago between them … Surely no other books were so fair and sweet, so wise and true'.


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